Alternative University

Solar Trough Electricity (STE)

Page 3:  Morocco

Ouarzazate

Two solar trough plants at Ouarzazate, Morocco, referred to as Noor I and Noor II, are now generating 360 MW of electricity. Noor I generates 160 MW, and Noor II generates 200 MW. Both power plants are adjacent to each other. All photographs on this page are of those two solar trough plants at Ouarzazate, Morocco.

Figure 1:  Solar trough collector field, Morocco. [WorldBank]

Figure 2:  Solar trough collector field, Morocco.

Figure 3:  Solar trough collectors, Morocco.

Figure 4:  Assembling solar trough collectors, Morocco.

Figure 5:  Installing solar trough collectors, Morocco.

Figure 6:  Heat transfer fluid pipes for solar trough collectors, Morocco.

Figure 7:  Portion of solar trough collector field, Morocco, showing two molten salt tanks in center of photograph, which allow electricity to be generated at night. Note: Molten salt tank on the right is partially obscured by steam.

Figure 8:  Molten salt tank, solar trough collector power plant, Morocco.

Figure 9:  Worker at solar trough power plant, Morocco.

Figure 10:  Monitoring solar trough power plant, Morocco.

Figure 11:  Screen shot of control system of Noor I solar trough power plant, generating 107.87 MW of electricity at 11:15 AM on the 12th of September 2017. Heat transfer fluid was 277°C entering the collectors, 384°C leaving the collectors.

Figure 12:  Washing solar trough collectors at night.

Figure 13:  Washing solar trough collectors at night.

Figure 14:  Washing solar trough collectors at night.

Sahara Desert

Morocco is part of the Sahara Desert, which is well suited for siting of solar trough electricity generating power plants. Morocco is the country in the upper left corner of Africa:

Figure 15:  Mediterranean and North Africa (MENA) countries. Yellow areas have higher direct normal irradiance (DNI) suitable for siting of solar trough power plants. Only a fraction of that area would be enough to provide all global or European electricity needs. [DLR]

Figure 16:  Desertec map showing where solar trough power plants (“concentrated solar power” – CSP) can be located, connected to Europe with high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines. Red square labelled “World 2005” indicates how much land area (square kilometers) CSP would need to provide all of the world's electricity (at 2005 usage), “EU-25” to provide just Europe's electricity, etc. [Desertec 2005]

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